Update for Mexico Customs Vehicle / Car Import Rules

Dec. 18, 2014
Jan. 2015 Update for Rules on Vehicle/Car Imports
SAT/Aduana has announced their latest rules for permanently importing cars and non-dually pickup trucks into Mexico.  The rules take effect on Jan. 1, 2015, and are described in the following video:

The ever-helpful, very talented Mexican attorney Spencer McMullen ( Chapalalaw.com ) has offered the following summary of the new Aduana rules for permanent vehicle imports by private individuals.

What vehicles can be imported:
~ Used NAFTA cars and non-dually pickups:  VIN shows they were made or assembled in Mexico, the USA or Canada.
~ 8 to 9 year old cars. **
~  Vehicles whose rights are restricted or prohibited from being driven in their home country are prohibited from importation.

Requirements & Notes:
~ Importation fee: Ten percent of the value of the vehicle, plus taxes due for entry into the country. ***
~ Cars can be imported by Mexicans living in Mexico and abroad.
~ Importers need official ID and CURP, car title in their name or signed-over to them,  emissions certificate,  nothing limiting their right to be driven in their home country

Procedures
1.  Go to a customs agent with your ID, letter of appointment of customs broker, and vehicle title.
2.  Verify that the customs agent:
~    ~ Obtains a certificate that the vehicle complies with physical / mechanical conditions and environmental protection (verification centers exist close to the border zone Aduanas).
~    ~ Verifies that the vehicle has not been reported stolen
~    ~ Verifies that the vehicle VIN number matches the title.
~    ~ Presents any/all US-titled vehicles to American Customs (CBP) to perform the required US export (this process takes an average of two days – but CBP rules say to bring the vehicle to them 72 hours before the planned export).   (Editor’s Note: The rules for Canadian vehicles are still being resolved on this issue.)
~    ~ Prepares the importation pedimento.
~    ~ Pays the proper taxes
~    ~ Turns in the definitive importation pedimento fully paid.

3.  Present the vehicle along with the pedimento at the aduana module for inspection and receive the import pedimentos with its attachments and register the vehicle in the Public Vehicle Registry.

Remember, only a licensed customs agent can do the procedure with Aduana.  Vehicle importations are not done in the street.  Do not turn over money or documents in the street.

I am just the messenger, I do not know how Canadians will fare without a title, or why they should deal with US customs or heck if anybody but a Mexican can import as it doesn’t mention foreigners at all.  Also I have no idea how people will babysit customs agents and make sure they comply with the list of items SAT gives.”

This good information was prepared by Mexican licensed attorney Lic. Spencer Richard McMullen (Cédula #7928026) and official court translator (Perito Traductor). Mx 376-765-7553   Chapalalaw.com

Yucalandia’s Notes:
** The upcoming NAFTA requirements describe 4 year old and older vehicles as being eligible for import by Jan. 1, 2015:

NAFTA Agreement Effects on Importing US/Canadian Used Cars into Mexico

“… (d) beginning January 1, 2015, Mexico may not adopt or maintain a prohibition or restriction on imports from the territories of Canada or the United States of originating used vehicles that are at least four years old; … “

*** Ten percent import fees are based on the Mex. Gob.’s official published values at:  http://www.aduanas-mexico.com.mx/…_estimados.html#ane2 

*    *    *    *    *    *    *
For details on driving in Mexico, see our main article on importing cars at: Importing & Driving a Car in Mexico https://yucalandia.com/driving-in-mexico-issues-fun/importing-driving-a-car-in-mexico/
*    *    *    *    *    *    *
Feel free to copy while giving proper attribution:
YucaLandia/Surviving Yucatan. ©Steven M. Fry

Read-on MacDuff . . .

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31 Responses to Update for Mexico Customs Vehicle / Car Import Rules

  1. Penny Schikora says:

    I have a question. The comment about 8 to 9 year old cars, does that mean that only cars within those years can be imported or nationalized. We have had some questions as we have a 1998 pickup we have thought of importing and nationalizing as we are Permanente Residente. Would like to know where to check online to find more info. Thanks

    • yucalandia says:

      Hi Penny,
      My source of information was a NAFTA agreement. Spencer’s source of information is a SAT website.

      It is possible that the SAT is using their old standby policy of just 8-9 year old vehicles – which has been on the books for years, but they clearly have some other work-around policies of allowing 6 year old and older vehicles for years (following NAFTA rules).

      We may have to wait and see what the actual policy is,
      steve

      • Penny Schikora says:

        Thanks. We won’t be doing much until next spring with our Ford pickup so will be waiting to see what they do.

  2. Meir says:

    8 to 9 year old cars? According to your last post it should become 2 to 4 years. https://yucalandia.com/2014/11/12/nafta-agreement-effects-on-importing-uscanadian-used-cars-into-mexico/ I have TIP 2010 chevy silverado. My “FM3” expires next year so I have to import the car this discrepancy makes a big difference for me. The issue of pollution inspection is another problem as they refused local government inspection on my previous car and I had to send it back.

    • yucalandia says:

      Hi Meir,
      My source of information was a NAFTA agreement. Spencer’s source of information is a SAT website.

      It is possible that the SAT is using their old standby policy of just 8-9 year old vehicles – which has been on the books for years, but they clearly have some other work-around policies of allowing 6 year old and older vehicles for years (following NAFTA rules),
      steve

  3. Ron says:

    We have a US Plated, made in USA, 2003 Mitsubishi Galant legal in Mexico until next Spring at which time we want to nationalize it. Still possible?

    • yucalandia says:

      Hi Ron,
      The Galant is not a NAFTA manufactures/assembled car (true?) – which means private individuals cannot nationalize a Galant.
      steve

      • Ron says:

        The Galant is a NAFTA car according to ADUANA in Manzanillo. Made in USA.

      • yucalandia says:

        Hi Ron,
        GREAT!

        My memory was that the early 2003 Galants (the 8’th generation version) were not NAFTA (made in Japan or Venezuela), and the late 2003 Galants (the 9’th generation version – made after Oct 15,2003 ) were made in the USA.

        You must have one of the first US-made Galants… If the VIN starts with a number – then it is for sure a NAFTA vehicle. Early 2003 Galants would have a VIN starting with a J (or other letter).
        steve

        )

      • Ron says:

        Thanks Steve…yucalandia. The VIN for the 2003 Galant starts with a 4. This summer we drove to Quebec City and back, over 10,000 MILES, with absolutely no problems. We know it is not worth anything on a trade but will ask the local Mitsubishi dealer for an opinion before deciding on nationalizing it. Feliz Navidad

  4. stephen spiegel says:

    In other words, sell your vehicle before moving and buy one here. lol

  5. Chuck Friedman says:

    Do the NAFTA regs have any impact on the importation guidelines? Any idea how the NAFTA regulation (see “d” below) that, at least theoretically, goes into effect Jan. 1, 2015 will impact the age of the vehicles that can be imported? (d) beginning January 1, 2015, Mexico may not adopt or maintain a prohibition or restriction on imports from the territories of Canada or the United States of originating used vehicles that are at least four years old;

  6. DUKE says:

    This does contract the specs in NAFTA; Can anyone delineate additional taxes for import/entry?

  7. dukeabq says:

    Yes, NAFTA reads different from new regs. Does anybody know what the additioal entry taxes are?

  8. Let me clarify

    ~ Vehicles whose rights are restricted or prohibited from being driven in their home country are prohibited from importation. (? – Editor’s note: Waiting for clarification on this item)

    I should have said rights have NOT been restricted or prohibited.

    The original Spanish says vehicles not found to be restricted or prohibited, forgot to put the not, the double negative / negation got me. In Mexican law you do not have to prove negatives, which is also curious here

  9. Martha Rees says:

    Reblogged this on MARTHA'S GENTEEL DECLINE and commented:
    Mexico Auto Customs Rule

  10. Holly G says:

    Is there any update on this issue yet? I am hoping they will open it back up to older cars, and I have heard rumors that it may possibly happen. Have you hears anything?

    • yucalandia says:

      Hi Holly,
      Nothing but rumors.

      Some Americans are using the “presta nombre” route, where a Mexican citizen imports your car, but the Mexican is the owner of your vehicle (on all the records), and I believe that you wind up paying double taxes on this, as the Mexican’s import of the car is taxed, and then you are taxed when you register the car in your name.
      steve

  11. mhstherapy says:

    If I have a resident temporal for four years and a TIP for my vehicle for four years can I fly back to Canada each year and leave my vehicle in Mexico for four years?.

  12. mhstherapy says:

    —“You have to send a letter to Aduana every year when you renew your RT visa, formally notifying them of your INM Visa’s NEW expiration date.” —
    If my visa is good for four years but I leave, are you saying that I need to renew my RT, every time I exit/ re-enter the country. Or if my RT is good for four years there is no need to alert Aduana because I would have my TIP for four years as well.

    Thank You.

    • yucalandia says:

      Hi mhstherapy,
      We have never heard that INM actually ever issued a Residente Temporal visa that was good for 4 years.

      At best we have heard of 3 year renewals (which means you have to send at least one written notice to Aduana … and sometimes Aduana still only extends the TIP expiration date for 1 year, which means you have to re-file another letter the following years to extend the TIP).

      Did Aduana actually send you a letter confirming that they extended your TIP for 3 more years ?

      If so, that would be a totally new (VERY COOL) thing we’ve never seen nor heard of before.

      So… if you didn’t send in the written application letter to Aduana to extend your expiration date on your TIP, your TIP may still be valid (check the Aduana/Banjercito websites) … but you almost definitely lost the $$deposit if you did not send the letter.

      BEST OF LUCK…

      and we look forward to you coming back to tell us how it works out. (Thanks!)

      Happy Trails,
      steve

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